John Sloan Original Etching Sidewalk Pencil Signed 1917

An original 1917 etching by John Sloan (1871-1951), original founder and member of the Ashcan School of American Art. Sloan was a Realist artist and known for his gritty urban scenes of New York. ‘Sidewalk’ etching depicts a mother directing her young son to urinate in the middle of a bustling sidewalk scene. Sloan said that his paintings were made with "sympathy, but no social consciousness ... I was never interested in putting propaganda into my paintings, so it annoys me when art historians try to interpret my city life pictures as 'socially conscious.' I saw the everyday life of the people, and on the whole, I picked out bits of joy in human life for my subject matter."

Signed, titled, and inscribed ‘100 proofs’ in pencil, lower margin

Signed and dated 1917 in the plate

A rich dark impression. No tape, glue, attachment marks, or residue. No abrasions, scratches, folds, or creases indicating rolling or the like. Toning, two small specks of foxing, a small tear at the top right of paper edge, and one small dark speck at the lower right edge. Unframed.

Noted in Peter Morse John Sloan Prints A Catalogue Raisonné of the Etchings, Lithographs, and Posters. New Haven and London, 1969, cat. no. 184. ii, p. 210, ill.

Dimensions:

Plate: 3 1/4 x 6 1/2 in

Sheet: 8 1/8 x 10 5/8 in